Overseas assests - requirement to correct

Undeclared Overseas Assets? Beware the ‘Requirement to Correct’ Deadline!

Overseas assests - requirement to correct

What does this mean for me?

If you are a taxpayer with overseas assets which are undeclared as regards income tax, capital gains tax or inheritance tax, you have an obligation to sort things out by 30 September 2018.

People who ignore this requirement and whose income or assets subsequently come to light will face much, much higher penalties and sanctions after the deadline.

Why bother now?

The United Kingdom has signed up for information exchange with a whole host of other countries. The information it receives from them will be input into its intelligence system known as Connect. This increases the likelihood of undeclared sources coming to light.

What if I do nothing?

After the deadline date, if your undeclared sources of income or gains come to light, you will face potential penalties as follows:

  • A tax geared penalty of between 100% and 200% of the tax due;
  • A potential asset based penalty of up to 10% of the asset value where the relevant tax at stake is over £25,000 in any one tax year;
  • Adverse publicity from being publicly named as a tax cheat where the tax is over £25,000;
  • A further potential penalty of 50% of the standard penalty if the Revenue show that assets or funds have been moved in an attempt to avoid the requirement to correct.

If you have a reasonable excuse for failing to correct your tax position, such as failing health for example, then penalties may be reduced or not charged in exceptional circumstances.

Get Started:

If you think you might be affected or are in any doubt, we suggest you act now to avoid any problems before the deadline.

Call Taxfile on 0208 761 8000 for a no-obligation discussion if you want to put things right. Alternatively, book an appointment here. We have a wealth of experience in dealing with voluntary disclosures and negotiating settlements with HMRC, so can definitely help you. We offer tax advice and accountancy services from our offices in Tulse Hill, Dulwich and Battersea in South and South West London along with tax experts in Exeter, Plymouth, Poole, Dorset, Devon, Yorkshire and Carlisle.

HMRC are clamping down on landlords

HMRC are clamping down on landlords who do not declare income from lettingsHMRC are constantly reviewing who has and has not declared income properly from letting out property, whether that’s from short-term lets, long-term lets, holiday lets, letting rooms to students or to workforces. And with new, sophisticated, data sharing systems now in full force across many agencies, authorities, online, via tip-offs and surveillance, the Government has its sights on an estimated 1.5 million landlords who they think have under-paid tax.

Taxfile are here to help landlords get their tax right and to make sure all genuine expenditure is offset against their final tax bill. They can also help out when things have become complicated by liaising with HMRC on behalf of the landlord under fire. Contact Taxfile for an informal chat, without obligation (you can even book an appointment online) or ask for a copy of our ‘Landlords Beware’ information sheet.

Record haul by HMRC in tax avoidance crackdown

Record anti-avoidance tax haul by HMRCBack in January we reported that HMRC had raised an extra £20.7 billion in additional revenue for the financial year 2012-13 as a result of it’s drive on tax compliance and a massive crackdown on tax avoidance by organisations and individuals alike. Now we can confirm that the financial year 2013-14 figures are in and HMRC has increased their haul to £23.9 billion in additional tax for the year – an all time record and one which represents 5% of the total tax yield for the year. This is an increase of £3.9 billion on the year before and it’s up a whopping £9 billion compared to 3 years ago. George Osborne will be doubly pleased because this year’s figure also beats the target he set in his Autumn Statement by £1 billion clear.

Of the £23.9 billion raised in these latest figures, £8 billion is derived from large businesses, £1 billion from criminals and a further £2.7 billion is the result of successfully tackling tax avoidance schemes in the courts. That leaves £12.2 billion which we Read more

HMRC’s fight against tax avoidance is bearing fruit

HMRC has reported that it raised an extra £20.7 billion in additional revenue during the financial year 2012-13, a result of its continued push on tax compliance and anti-avoidance measures. That’s an increase of £2.1 billion on the preceding year and is actually £2 billion above its original target.

This information comes hot on the heals of the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement, about which we reported in early December. Following that Statement, the Treasury issued documents including a ‘Scorecard’ which measures the impact of the Chancellor’s actions in regard to revenue collections. Of the 59 items listed in the scorecard, 20 fell directly into the categories of “Avoidance, tax planning and fairness” or “Fraud, error and debt”. The measures are estimated to yield a further £1,515 million in 2014-15 and £8,900 million in total by close of play 2018-19. Read more

Assets hidden offshore? Not for long!

Financial information sharing now reaches the Cayman Islands, Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey.

On November 5th, Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs (‘HMRC’) announced that the Cayman Islands had joined the ever-growing list of offshore territories which will now automatically share financial information with them in respect to UK taxpayers who may have accounts there. This follows similar agreements which took place in October for Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. Clearly the idea is to further aid in HMRC’s clampdown on tax evasion and avoidance.

The Cayman Islands also agreed to become an integral part of the G5 multi-lateral information sharing initiative involving a total of 31 territories including the UK, France, Germany and Spain, based on an earlier agreement with the U.S. and now also including cooperation with South Africa. The transparency of who really owns and controls UK companies is also a key HMRC aim.

This is all an important step towards the creation of a global standard in tax transparency and information sharing, an initiative originally agreed Read more

HMRC now has landlords in their sights

Residential property lettingsHMRC (Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs) has announced some new initiatives over the course of the last month and one of these is The Let Property campaign which is a campaign designed to recover undeclared tax from those receiving income from residential property lets. The idea is to encourage those landlords with under-declared income or gains (potentially including income tax, Capital Gains Tax and VAT) to contact them in order to make a full disclosure. By doing so they may well avoid the higher penalties which may be applied to them should HMRC discover the undeclared income/gains via other means. Don’t forget that they now have access to information shared across systems, including in relation to properties both at home and abroad, as well as being gained through their digital intelligence system ‘Connect’ which identifies links between individuals, entities and properties. So the message to landlords is loud and clear!

The campaign applies to landlords whether they have just a single property or a large portfolio of properties and encompasses lets to students, business workforces and the holiday market. Read more

HMRC now see payments you receive via credit card!

On September 1st 2013 new legislation kicked in which allows HMRC automatic access to data showing payments made to businesses via credit card, going back as long as 4 years. HMRC will receive this information direct from the companies who process credit card payments on behalf of businesses (‘merchant acquirers’).

No personal data identifying the card owners, nor the credit card numbers, will be supplied as part of the data — it will primarily show the quantity of transactions and values credited to any particular business via credit card. On its own this may reap £50 million per annum in otherwise ‘lost’ tax revenue and the exercise will be helped by HMRC’s ‘Connect’ system which compares data coming in from various sources and cross-refers for consistency. The scheme’s implementation has been aided by a £1 billion budget given to HMRC aimed at tackling tax evasion and fraud.

The new legislation is part of the Finance Act 2013 and is part of a major crackdown on tax evasion which overall costs the taxpayer £9 billion a year Read more

HMRC launches site for those with undeclared income

HMRC has launched a new mini-site aimed at those with undeclared income. “We’re closing in” they say, using new technology and additional staff. They follow it up to say “if you have any income you haven’t told us about, you need to declare it before we catch you”. So the site aims to encourage relevant parties to come forwards voluntarily to declare such income, rather than waiting to be discovered. It’s not quite an ‘amnesty’ but it kind of hints at being a better way to deal with the situation. Links are given such as “How do I put it right” which takes them to the main HMRC website page outlining how to put your tax affairs in order.

Other links on the same mini site take visitors to areas such as ‘Owning up to fraud‘ and ‘Tell us about someone who is not declaring all their income” so the net is clearly closing in*. We took a look at the ‘Owning up to fraud’ page and it makes interesting reading. Read more